seraphica:

Kim Kelley-Wagner has two daughters who were adopted from China. In everyday life, they have been subjected to horrid statements from people - to their faces, to their mother as they stood by her, etc. In this photo collection, shared on her blog, Kim and her daughters (Lily and Meika) put these ignorant cruelties front and center. [x]

"I have tried to explain to my daughters that people do not say these things to be mean, they say them out of ignorance, which is why I am sharing some of them. Words are powerful, they can become tools or weapons, choose to use them wisely."

THIS IS AWFUL THAT PEOPLE SAID THESE THINGS! OMGoodness people—stop being so effing ignorant!!

Posted 3 hours ago / 92 notes / Via: weareteachers

weareteachers:

We once heard of a teacher who dressed up in her best bell bottoms and discoed her way into her classroom on the first day with Gloria Gaynor blasting from the speakers. Elaborate, but memorable—and if you decide to go that route, please send us a video so we can post it on our Facebook page

plannedparenthoodla:

The Peer Advocates are a group of high school students who are trained by health educators at Planned Parenthood Los Angeles to serve as resources for sexual and reproductive health information in their schools and communities.

We asked the Peer Advocates about the most common misconceptions of teens and what they would like people to know about them. Here is what they said!

Yes, yes, yes! When I tell people I like to teach high school they’re like, “OMG teenagers are hard! I couldn’t work with teenagers!” As if they all have horrendous behavior. Good job, guys! Keep up your great work! :)

Posted 3 hours ago / 103 notes / Via: girlwithalessonplan

teachmoments:

One of the better “nuts and bolts” investigations I’ve read into the problems urban schools deal with on a daily, monthly, and yearly basis. 

Posted 3 hours ago / 40 notes / Via: fuckyeahsexeducation
Anonymous asked “I don't suppose you know where I can access help as a man in an abusive relationship in the UK? I'm literally terrified of my boyfriend. I want to leave him but I can't because his name is on the mortgage of the house. I can't go home because my parents kicked me out when I came out and I can't find a shelter where I can go. I'm at my wit's end - please if you know any resources or anything, I'll be eternally grateful.”

survivingfamilyviolence:

hey, sorry it took me a while to respond to you. I found a few websites that might be of help

http://www.brokenrainbow.org.uk/ ”an LGBT domestic violence charity”

http://www.esteemmen.co.uk/ for men affected by domestic violence, they also offer support options

www.mensadviceline.org.uk have a page for gay and bisexual men experiencing domestic abuse

hopefully one of those orgs will be able to help you with housing and working out property divisions. If you’re able, I would strongly recommend seeing a lawyer (a community lawyer may be free or at least low cost) to find out what your rights are. Even if the mortgage is in his name, if you’ve been living together for a certain period of time you may have some legal entitlement to it and other assets, especially those you both collected while together. Please let me know if this is of any help and what happens, keeping you in my thoughts xo

Posted 3 hours ago / 5 notes / Via: anxietydisorderprobs
clairvoyantss asked “I've been dealing with anxiety for a number of years now, but recently I've found this app called calm and honestly it's been amazing. You can chose how long your session is and it pretty much just makes you focus on your body and helps calm you down. It's worked so well for me when I feel like I'm going to have a panic attack or if I'm just stressing out. I just thought that I would share this with you guys since I know a number of people deal with the same things I do”

anxietydisorderprobs:

Thanks for the suggestion!

lukas-the-lighting-queer:

if you don’t clap when the cast points up to the booth, tech crew judges you. you can’t see us, but we can see you. we can see you not clapping. and we judge you from above. 

I always clap for all the people because I used to be in orchestra pit. Every job of a performance is important! Tech people rock!

Posted 4 hours ago / 239,493 notes / Via: amduringer

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

shepherdsongs:

I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

I LOVE SUMMER SCHOOL!!!!

I have loved, loved, LOVED working as a para in the ESY/summer school program. We have way more paras per student, we’ve been fortunate to have done some excellent activities, and I feel that we’ve had the chance to really support the student as intensively as they need. It’s less stressful because of all the support and how closely every class works together, checking on each other, having gym time together, scheduling swim times, and giving each other advice on kids we know about.

So I am incredibly bummed that I am missing two days of this last week of summer school this week due to dizziness and other frustrating symptoms. It’s killing me. I don’t think I have ever been this frustrated to miss work. I love the staff, the kids, and the program. When I finally get a job as a teacher, I will still come back and work with this same ILC teacher as a para for ESY. 

I’m hoping I can make it for Wednesday and Thursday… or at the very least our last day, Thursday. 

Posted 4 hours ago / 16,255 notes / Via: wildlywandering

rheill:

dailydot:

Assassin’s Creed fail reveals how sexist animation standards are failing real women,
This is the same gorgeously animated, acclaimed franchise that devotes an entire subset of game play to tree-climbing. Swinging from limb to limb high above the incredibly detailed world? High on the priority list of Assassin’s Creed features. Putting a single woman into an active role in the game? Nah.
Earlier this year, the lead animator of Frozen protested that Disney's 3-D animation software literally didn’t possess the ability to make women’s faces look distinguishable from one another.
This is the same studio that employed a visual effects team of over 40 people in order to design the unique properties of snowflakes. Literally, the women of Tangled and Frozen were less distinguishable to Disney animation software than a pile of snow.
The tangle of issues and layers of sexism that contribute to this situation is overwhelming, but at the core is the fundamentally flawed way women are portrayed in comics, animation, and gaming: a feedback loop of sexual objectification and industry complacence.  
When you perpetuate the idea, across various art-based mediums, that women in drawn art, comics, and animation must and should look and move with flowy, exaggerated gestures, graceful movements, and hips, chest, and ass thrust forward in order to pander to the male gaze at all times, then you make it easier, later on, to use your own sexist animation and art standards as an excuse for why you don’t have more women.
[READ MORE]
We take you on a visual walk-through of the gaming industry and animation culture’s resistance to making women look, act, and move like human beings.

Important and potent.

rheill:

dailydot:

Assassin’s Creed fail reveals how sexist animation standards are failing real women,

This is the same gorgeously animated, acclaimed franchise that devotes an entire subset of game play to tree-climbing. Swinging from limb to limb high above the incredibly detailed world? High on the priority list of Assassin’s Creed features. Putting a single woman into an active role in the game? Nah.

Earlier this year, the lead animator of Frozen protested that Disney's 3-D animation software literally didn’t possess the ability to make women’s faces look distinguishable from one another.

This is the same studio that employed a visual effects team of over 40 people in order to design the unique properties of snowflakes. Literally, the women of Tangled and Frozen were less distinguishable to Disney animation software than a pile of snow.

The tangle of issues and layers of sexism that contribute to this situation is overwhelming, but at the core is the fundamentally flawed way women are portrayed in comics, animation, and gaming: a feedback loop of sexual objectification and industry complacence.  

When you perpetuate the idea, across various art-based mediums, that women in drawn art, comics, and animation must and should look and move with flowy, exaggerated gestures, graceful movements, and hips, chest, and ass thrust forward in order to pander to the male gaze at all times, then you make it easier, later on, to use your own sexist animation and art standards as an excuse for why you don’t have more women.

[READ MORE]

We take you on a visual walk-through of the gaming industry and animation culture’s resistance to making women look, act, and move like human beings.

Important and potent.


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ABOUT

journeytoenglisheducationEducation is not preparation for life; education is life itself. ~John Dewey


Hello, fellow educators!
In May 2012 I earned my bachelor's degree in English Education (5-12) and I currently work as an Intensive Learning Center paraprofessional at a middle school. Follow me as I venture into the world of teaching: continuing the applying process, re-writing resumes and cover letters, and preparing for interviews! Most of my posts are education or English related. Occasionally I find something I love very much or believe is very important, so I cannot help but share it!

Feel free to share your experiences as a future, present, or former teacher. All advice is welcome. :)

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